PLASTIC FOR TICKETS: FREE TRAVEL FOR RECYCLING IN ROME

Travellers in Rome are being offered free metro tickets in exchange for plastic bottles to make the city more environmentally friendly. The ‘+ Ricicli + Viaggi’ programme, Travellers in Rome are being offered free metro tickets in exchange for plastic bottles to make the city more environmentally friendly. The ‘+ Ricicli + Viaggi’ programme, launched by the public transport company ATAC, is currently running at three stations. Two weeks after the system was introduced, 11,000 discarded plastic bottles had already been returned and now more than 20,000 bottles a day are being handed in. Because of the positive response from the public to the initiative, the plan is to be extended across the whole metro network until July 2020. Through an app, users can scan their barcode and deposit plastic bottles into a special recycling machine placed in the stations in exchange for a €0.05 credit that can be spent to purchase tickets. A standard ticket, valid for one metro ride or 100 minutes on all buses allowing transfers, costs €1.50 so passengers need only 30 bottles to cover the cost.

‘EXTRAORDINARY’ ROMAN VILLA REOPENED TO PUBLIC IN HERCULANEUM

Herculaneum

An ancient Roman house has reopened to the public in the archaeological park of Herculaneum, the town near Naples buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD79. Considered the site’s most noble Roman villa, the House of the Bicentenary had been under restoration for 35 years.There is still a significant portion of Herculaneum, which attracts 500,000 visitors a year compared to Pompeii’s 4 million, that is yet to be excavated. “Research is being done at Herculaneum, services have improved and it is a wonderfully attractive place,” the culture minister Franceschini added. “What has been happening at the brightest spot, Pompeii, in recent years has also happened at Herculaneum and we will continue to invest.”

BOOK OF THE MONTH

Erri De Luca “MONTEDIDIO” (GOD’S MOUNTAIN)

Erri De Luca (born 1950, Naples) is an Italian novelist, translator and poet. He has been recognized by critic Giorgio De Rienzo of Corriere della Sera as “the writer of the decade”. He is also known for his opposition to the Lyon-Turin high speed train line, and is being sued for having called for its sabotage.

This is a story told by a boy in his thirteenth year, recorded in his secret diary. His life is about to change; his world, about to open.

He lives in Montedidio—God’s Mountain—a cluster of alleys in the heart of Naples. He works in a carpentry workshop where he sweeps the floor. He is on his way to becoming a man—his boy’s voice is abandoning him. His wooden boomerang is neither toy nor tool, but something in between. Then there is Maria, the thirteen-year-old girl who lives above him and, like so many girls, is wiser than he. She carries the burden of a secret life herself…

SONG OF THE MONTH

This month we recommend “Granada” by Claudio Villa as this song appears in the movie “An almost perfect country”, chosen for the November film night. Claudio Villa was an actor and Italian tenor, who recorded over 3000 songs, sold 45 million records, and appeared in 25 musicals during his career. He won “Canzonissima” in 1966 with “Granada” song. Canzonissima was an Italian musical variety show broadcast by Rai 1 from 1958 to 1974. The second link is for the lyrics.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gktf2FhXqdM

https://www.lyrics.com/lyric/4455948/Claudio+Villa/Granada

RECIPE OF THE MONTH

CITRUS PESTO (PESTO DI AGRUMI) a burst of summer flavours and colours, perfect to liven up November cooking! Check the website recipe corner for details.

ART OF THE MONTH

 L’Umanita’ contro il male (Humanity against evil)

Now at Rome’s National Gallery of Modern Art it was one of the first works by Ravenna-born sculptor Gaetano Cellini (1873-1937). This allegory is a perfect fit for Auguste Rodin’s quotation, “Art is the most sublime mission of mankind, since it is the expression of thought, which seeks to understand the world and to make it understood.” Cellini was obviously inspired by Michelangelo as well.

 

A presto